Prozac Nation

Iniciado por APeterFrupt, 08 de Junio de 2021, 14:11:35 PM

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APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


Critics were divided over the confessional tone of “Prozac Nation.” But Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times wrote that it “ultimately wins the reader over.”

APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


Critics were divided over the confessional tone of “Prozac Nation.” But Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times wrote that it “ultimately wins the reader over.”

APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


Critics were divided over the confessional tone of “Prozac Nation.” But Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times wrote that it “ultimately wins the reader over.”

APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


Critics were divided over the confessional tone of “Prozac Nation.” But Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times wrote that it “ultimately wins the reader over.”

APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


Critics were divided over the confessional tone of “Prozac Nation.” But Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times wrote that it “ultimately wins the reader over.”

APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


Critics were divided over the confessional tone of “Prozac Nation.” But Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times wrote that it “ultimately wins the reader over.”

APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


Critics were divided over the confessional tone of “Prozac Nation.” But Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times wrote that it “ultimately wins the reader over.”

APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


Critics were divided over the confessional tone of “Prozac Nation.” But Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times wrote that it “ultimately wins the reader over.”

APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


Critics were divided over the confessional tone of “Prozac Nation.” But Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times wrote that it “ultimately wins the reader over.”

APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


Critics were divided over the confessional tone of “Prozac Nation.” But Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times wrote that it “ultimately wins the reader over.”

APeterFrupt

Elizabeth Wurtzel, whose startling 1994 memoir, “Prozac Nation: Young and Depressed in America,” won praise for opening a dialogue about clinical depression and helped introduce an unsparing style of confessional writing that remains influential, died on Tuesday in Manhattan. She was 52.


Critics were divided over the confessional tone of “Prozac Nation.” But Michiko Kakutani of The New York Times wrote that it “ultimately wins the reader over.”